I’ll Remember

Hmm, hmm
Say goodbye
Not knowing when
The truth in my whole life began
Say goodbye
Not knowing how to cry
You taught me that

And I’ll remember
The strength that you gave me
Now that I’m standing on my own
I’ll remember
The way that you saved me
I’ll remember

Inside I was a child
That could not mend a broken wing
Outside I looked for a way
To teach my heart to sing

And I’ll remember
The love that you gave me
Now that I’m standing on my own
I’ll remember
The way that you changed me
I’ll remember

I learned
To let go
Of the illusion
That we can possess
I learned to let go
I travel in stillness
And I’ll remember happiness
I’ll remember, hmm

I’ll remember, hmm
And I’ll remember
The love that you gave me
Now that I’m standing on my own
I’ll remember
The way that you changed me
I’ll remember (I’ll rememeber)

Now I’ll never be afraid to cry
Now I finally have a reason why

I’ll remember (I’ll remember)
Now I’ll never be afraid to cry
Now I finally have a reason why

I’ll remember (I’ll remember)
Now I’ll never be afraid to cry
And I finally have a reason why

I’ll remember (I’ll remember)
Now I’ll never be afraid to cry
And I finally have a reason why

I’ll Remember – Madonna

I remember one day when you dropped me at kindergarten so long ago.
I remember going to Red’s Dairy Freeze.
I remember cookouts in Fort Williams.
I remember riding my coaster on a hill in Fort Williams.
I remember riding into Portland in your pickup.
I remember you rushing me to Dr. Russel when I had a reaction to a bee sting.
I remember sitting on a spare tire while you pulled Cheryl and I with your truck on the frozen lake.
I remember going with you to work on Exchange St.
I remember you picking me up many times when I had no ride.
I remember how hard you worked to make sure we were provided for.
I remember you always had Life Savers in your pocket.
I remember how much you loved Ginger your dog.
I remember helping build your house in Poland Maine.
I remember helping you plow and sand the camp road.
I remember camping at Tumbledown.
I remember how you struggled with cancer, and how I should have been there more for you.
I remember getting angry with you because I didn’t understand your behavior.
I remember watching you decline so quickly once the dementia took over.
I remember how helpless I felt.
I remember living with you and mom in Strong, and how much I wanted to help you.
I remember how much we really did love each other, we just couldn’t find the words.
I remember visiting you at Togus when you jumped out of your chair and hugged me.
I remember how much I regret not making a stronger effort before it was too late.

I remember how much I miss you Dad.

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The War Is Finally Over

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CARL ARTHUR PIERCE, 87

Carl Arthur Pierce, age 87, passed away at the Androscoggin Hospice House in Auburn, on February 10, 2017, after a long period of declining health. During his illness he had resided at Togus, and Coastal Manor in Yarmouth.

Carl was born in Portland on April 28, 1929, the second child of Chester “Chet” Pierce and Florence “Flossie” (Caldwell) Pierce. He grew up in the Riverton area, and attended Portland schools. At age 16, he began working at the S.D. Warren paper mill in Westbrook. Carl had a fondness for motorcycles in his youth, and drove his two Harley’s throughout Maine and New Mexico. He saw action in the Korean War, before being honorably discharged.

img_8239-largeHe was a Portland firefighter, at the Central Station, for 15 years. He was also a skilled finish carpenter, and very knowledgeable about many aspects of building construction. He worked many construction and remodeling jobs in and around Portland, notably in the Old Port. Later, he worked at Jordan Marsh and the Barron Center. Carl was a trusted employee and had a strong work ethic. He took good care of his family.

Carl had a son, Michael, from his first marriage. On June 2, 1962, he married Betty A. Grover (Thurlow), and gained three stepchildren as well. Carl loved children, and treated his stepchildren as his own. They all loved him as their “Dad”. Carl and Betty had two more children together. They were married for 54 years.

In 1969, Carl, along with Betty, began to study with Jehovah’s Witnesses. He was baptized some time after his wife. He made many good friends through his association with the Witnesses, and the Bible truths he learned brought him comfort and hope. Though he later ceased active participation, he never stopped believing what he had been taught, and he remained supportive of his family’s efforts for the rest of his life.

dad-gingerHe loved animals of all kinds, and used his carpentry skills to build many barns, pens, and cages to house all of the family’s numerous pets. He and Betty enjoyed feeding the birds and other wildlife on their property. They never turned away a stray cat, and adopted many cats and dogs over the years. He was especially fond of his last dog, a Chow Chow named Ginger, who went everywhere with him.

Carl was a homebody, but he did enjoy several trips with his family to Prince Edward Island in Canada, and also Florida. He liked his pickup trucks and classic country music.

Carl was predeceased by his parents and his older brother Donald. He is survived by his wife Betty of New Gloucester, his stepson David J. Albert of Texas, his stepdaughter Kathleen L. (Albert) Fortman and her husband John of Wiscasset, his stepson Gregory C. Grover and his wife Jodi of Raymond, his daughter Cheryl A. (Pierce) Stringer and her husband William “Ed” of New Gloucester, his son John D. Pierce of Bangor, his sister Evelyn Roberts of Portland, and several nieces and nephews.

There will be no funeral services. Family and friends are invited to a gathering at the Stringer home on Sunday, February 26, from 1:00PM on.

If friends desire, to honor Carl’s great love for animals, donations can be made in his memory to an animal shelter of your choice.

Goodbye Dad, you will always be with me.